SGLT2 inhibitors help reduce high blood pressure, study reports

Jack Woodfield
Fri, 07 Jul 2017
SGLT2 inhibitors help reduce high blood pressure, study reports
A group of oral medications given to people with type 2 diabetes have been found to help reduce high blood pressure, according to a review of research findings.

Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, such as canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin, help to filter out excess glucose from the blood. They are prescribed for people with type 2 diabetes to help lower blood glucose levels, but could also offer protection against hypertension (high blood pressure).

A research team from China, South Africa and Iran looked at 43 random trials which had involved 22,428 people. As well as high blood pressure, they examined how SGLT2 inhibitors affected health markers including cholesterol and triglycerides.

SGLT2 inhibitor therapy was shown to significantly reduce blood pressure throughout the studies. The researchers believe their review could indicate the drug as worthy of treatment expansion.

The team noted: "Treatment with SGLT2 glucose cotransporter inhibitors has beneficial off-target effects on BP in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and may also be of value in improving other cardiometabolic parameters, including lipid profile and body weight, in addition to their expected effects on glycemic control."

High blood pressure, otherwise known as hypertension, often affects people with type 2 diabetes, and having both conditions can increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke and other diabetes-related complications.

Daily exercise and healthy eating can help to control high blood pressure. Doctors advise a brisk walk on a daily basis can be enough to make adequate improvements.

Our Low Carb Program has been designed for people with diabetes to improve health in a holistic way in easy-to-follow steps. To join thousands of others who have benefitted, sign up today.

The findings have been published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
Leave a Comment
Login via Facebook
or
Have your say in the Diabetes Forum
Your comments may be moderated. Please report any spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts.