Magnesium in the diet could reduce stroke risks

Thu, 02 Feb 2012
A study carried out by the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm indicates that eating a diet rich in magnesium could lower the risk of having a stroke.

Strokes are the third highest cause of death in the UK. The most common form of stroke is ischemic stroke which results from a blood clot in the brain. People with diabetes have an increased risk of strokes.

The study revealed that the risk of suffering a stroke fell by 9% for each additional 100mg of magnesium that was eaten. Researchers are not sure exactly how magnesium is able to reduce stroke risk. One theory is that magnesium's ability to reduce blood pressure may be related.

The research involved a review of data from seven previously published studies which had documented magnesium intake and stroke. The combined studies included information on over 240,000 people in total. The recommended adult intake for magnesium is around 300mg for men and 270mg for women. Good sources of magnesium are whole grain foods, green leafy vegetables, including spinach and broccoli, nuts and beans.

Previous studies have also found a diet high in magnesium to be beneficial in lowering risk of type 2 diabetes.
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