BBC programme investigates the impact of type 2 diabetes

Jack Woodfield
Tue, 25 Oct 2016
BBC programme investigates the impact of type 2 diabetes
The BBC One programme Inside Out has highlighted how eating a healthy diet and finding support on online forums can help treat type 2 diabetes.

The programme, which was broadcast on Monday 24 October, focused on the diabetes epidemic in the UK. Public Health England figures suggest that one in 10 adults in the UK could have developed diabetes by 2035 and treatment could rise to 17 per cent of the overall NHS budget.

There are currently around 4.5 million people in the UK who now have diabetes; 90 per cent of cases are thought to be type 2 diabetes. But the condition can be very significantly improved through a simple, healthy diet.

Professor Anthony Barrett, Heartlands Hospital, told Inside Out: "We now have a lot of evidence that if people (with type 2 diabetes) control the condition, the risk of long-term complications can be dramatically reduced.

"I think we are weak in this country, right from government level at the Department of Health down to grass roots. We have to do something about this because if we don't we will bust the NHS. The government has to take some responsibility for this.

"We know what the cause of type 2 diabetes is and I don't believe the food industry has taken this seriously. We need legislation to improve the health of this country."

People with type 2 diabetes who have joined our Low Carb Program have an average HbA1c improvement of 1.1%, while health economists estimate the programme is saving the NHS £165 million pounds a year on reduced requirements for diabetes medication alone.

It was because of the users on our Diabetes Forum that we were inspired to launch the Low Carb Program - the anecdotal successes of their improved health from eating a low-carb diet showed that dependency on medication can be reduced and that blood glucose levels can be stabilized.

Moreover, people with prediabetes who have joined the program find that they reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, losing an average weight loss of 5kg after six months and increasing the amount of exercise they do by an average of 33 minutes.

While Public Health England says the number of people with the disease could top five million within 20 years if obesity is not tackled, users of our Low Carb Program are improving their health and losing weight by learning how to eat a diet consisting of fresh food, home cooking and avoid processed foods.
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