Whole grain fibre the diabetes diet aid

Wed, 12 Apr 2006
Whole grains are now recognised as something of a super food group in many diets, including diabetic . They are an essential constituent part of many food plans and help diabetics across the globe manage their disease. However, they may also help to prevent the disease, a German study has shown. A type of fibre in whole grains and some vegetables may be able to prevent diabetes. The study is published in the leading journal, Diabetes Care .

The fibre type, termed insoluble fibre, acts to prevent the onset of diabetes by improving bodily use of insulin. A decline in the body’s sensitivity to insulin is usually a major symptom of diabetes onset. Therefore, by making the body more sensitive to insulin one decreases diabetes risk, a German expert said. The study was carried out at the German Institute of Human Nutrition .

Fibre is divided into two major groups, termed insoluble and soluble. Insoluble fibre will not dissolve, and therefore passes through the digestive system almost completely intact. Soluble fibre dissolves into a gel, and is useful in lowering cholesterol and blood sugar levels.

The German studies comprised a group of under 20 overweight women, who ate a bread diet enriched with the insoluble fibre for three days, followed by a low-fibre bread for another three days. Insulin sensitivity significantly improved following the fibre consumption. Fibre supplements could be useful, the expert concluded, but the best fibre comes from natural sources.
Leave a Comment
Login via Facebook, Yahoo! and Hotmail
or
Have your full say in the Diabetes Forum
Your comments may be moderated. Please report any spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts.