Medtronic announces US launch of MiniMed 670g hybrid closed-loop system

Jack Woodfield
Thu, 08 Jun 2017
Medtronic announces US launch of MiniMed 670g hybrid closed-loop system
Medical device company Medtronic has announced the US launch of the 'world's first' hybrid closed-loop system, a near-artificial pancreas, for people with type 1 diabetes.

Medtronic's MiniMed 670G system, which self-adjusts blood sugar levels and delivers basal insulin when needed, has been given the go ahead by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Alejandro Galindo, president of the Intensive Insulin Management division within the Diabetes Group at Medtronic, said: "The response from the diabetes community has been tremendously positive and we are proud to be leading this remarkable period in diabetes history in partnership with the clinical and advocacy communities."

The pioneering MiniMed 670G has been vigorously tested. Research published in the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) last year showed the device led to less variation in blood sugar levels and fewer episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in people with diabetes aged 14 or older.

""We've essentially designed a smarter insulin pump that alleviates some of the burden associated with diabetes management, which can be unrelenting and exhausting," said Galindo.

The hybrid closed-loop system comprises the use of the Medtronic MiniMed 670G insulin pump, fourth-generation sensors and a control algorithm to determine basal insulin delivery.

This system helps to keep blood glucose levels within normal ranges by measuring levels every five minutes and automatically responding by administering or withholding insulin.

Dr Jennifer Lynn Sherr, assistant professor of endocrinology at the Yale School of Medicine, said: "The MiniMed 670G system has proven to be life-changing for many patients [...] and we are truly excited to be able to introduce it to many more who stand to benefit.

"We've seen this system positively impact not only patients [...], but also their caregivers who are experiencing a new sense of security. The constant vigilance that this chronic medical condition imposes on both patients and their families is now relaxed and caregivers have a new level of independence and freedom."
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