SGLT2 inhibitor type 2 diabetes drugs could cause diabetic ketoacidosis

Kurt Wood
Mon, 06 Jul 2015
SGLT2 inhibitor type 2 diabetes drugs could cause diabetic ketoacidosis
The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) is exploring the reportedly high incidences of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in people taking SGLT2 inhibitors. The investigation will take place at a conference the autumn.

SGLT2 inhibitors are drugs designed to reduce the blood glucose levels of people with type 2 diabetes. They operate by preventing the kidney from absorbing glucose, thereby forcing excess glucose to be passed out through the urine. SGLT2 inhibitors include canagliflozin (also known as Invokana), dapagliflzin (Farxiga) and empagliflozin (Jardiance).

The FDA has already released a safety announcement about the possible risks associated with SGLT2 inhibitors

Between March 2013 and June 2014, 20 cases of DKA - which does not commonly affect people with type 2 diabetes - were reported by patients taking SGLT2 inhibitors. Each case of DKA required emergency treatment.

The conference will be called the AACE Scientific and Clinical Review of DKA and the Effects of SGLT2 Inhibitors will take place on October 24-25 in Dallas. Diabetes experts will be invited to analyse the data and recommend an appropriate course of action.

"AACE's responsibility to its members and their diabetes patients is to conduct a complete, objective and balanced evaluation of this data and investigate any knowledge gaps before using our recommendations," said George Grunberger, president of the AACE.

"There are still unanswered questions to answer before we draw any definitive conclusions on the subject, and that is what this conference is designed to do."
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