NICE recommends dapagliflozin for triple therapy in type 2 diabetes

Jack Woodfield
Wed, 23 Nov 2016
NICE recommends dapagliflozin for triple therapy in type 2 diabetes
New guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommend that Forxiga (dapagliflozin) should be used treat type 2 diabetes as part of "triple therapy".

Forxiga, an SGLT2 inhibitor which works by helping the kidneys remove excess glucose through urine - lowering blood glucose levels - has been recommended as a third drug when two current type 2 diabetes drugs are not improving a patient's blood glucose levels.

Professor Carole Longson, director of the NICE centre for health technology evaluation, said: "Having a range of drug options makes it easier to tailor treatments for type 2 diabetes to each person's individual needs.

"This new guidance recommends dapagliflozin in triple therapy - only in combination with metformin and a sulphonylurea - which will widen the choice available for people whose diabetes isn’t well controlled with two drugs."

People with type 2 diabetes are often offered metformin as a first-line treatment alongside diet and exercise. But if this fails to improve their diabetes management, a second or even third drug might be added.

Prior to these guidelines, Jardiance (empagliflozin) and Invokana (canagliflozin) had been recommended by NICE as options for triple therapy. These drugs are also SGLT2 inhibitors and are already recommended for use as monotherapy if a person can't tolerate metformin or other specific drugs, or in dual therapy with metformin.

Longson added: "As we've been able to publish this final guidance sooner because of positive draft recommendations, we hope that people who need this extra treatment option will benefit more quickly."

People struggling to control their blood glucose levels with medication can achieve greater diabetes control by eating a low-carb diet. Our Low Carb Program has helped people to improve their diabetes control, lose weight and reduce their dependence on medication.
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