Anti-hypoglycemia drug receives funding in bid to progress to clinical trials

Jack Woodfield
Tue, 10 Apr 2018
Anti-hypoglycemia drug receives funding in bid to progress to clinical trials
The development of a pioneering hypoglycemia-preventing type 1 diabetes treatment has received $3.9m (£2.75m) in funding, it has been announced.

Zucara Therapeutics Inc. has been given the money to further its work on the innovative ZT-01 drug, which is administrated once a day to prevent low blood glucose levels.

It is hoped the money can be used to put the drug forward for clinical trials next year with a view to in time making it available for people with diabetes.

The funding has come from the Helmsley Charitable Trust which aspires to improve lives by supporting health and select place-based initiatives.

The chief executive officer for Zucara Therapeutics, Michael Midmer, said: "This significant funding from the Helmsley Charitable Trust fills an important gap in financing that we need to move our drug forward to be ready for clinical trials.

"It is a unique opportunity for us to work with the Helmsley Charitable Trust, an organization that is deeply involved in bringing type 1 diabetes (T1D) technologies and therapies to people with the disease and has strong connections in the diabetes community. We look forward to working together to advance our very exciting therapeutic to prevent hypoglycaemia in T1D."

Ben Williams, Program Officer in Helmsley's Type 1 Diabetes Program said: "We are excited to partner with Zucara and help them bring a first-in-class drug to the T1D community. Hypoglycemia is a major and often overlooked challenge for those living with T1D, and Zucara's drug takes a direct shot at this unmet need."

Zucara will work collaboratively with other leading institutions to further understand and restore the pancreas' natural ability to prevent hypoglycemia. Low blood sugar is classified as when sugar levels fall below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL).

Symptoms of hypoglycemia can include sweating, fatigue and dizziness. In extreme cases hypoglycaemia can lead to convulsions, unconsciousness and even coma. For more information on the causes and treatments of hypos visit our Hypo Training Program.
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