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Type 2 diabetes linked to worse cognitive test results

Worse performance on cognitive tests measuring abilities that control emotions, behaviours and thought is associated with type 2 diabetes.
Scientists from the University of Waterloo published their results in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine after examining the link between type 2 diabetes and a reduction of certain cognitive abilities.
Particularly, they examined the relationship with executive functions, such as instinctive and reflexive emotions and behaviours, like making knee-jerk reactions.
They analysed 60 studies, comparing 9,815 type 2 diabetics to 69,254 control group participants to assess how they performed in measures of executive function.
Type 2 burnout
The participants with type 2 diabetes were urged to consistently check their blood sugar levels and monitor daily requirements such as dietary choices and medication schedules.
The researchers observed burnout in many type 2 patients, with Professor Peter Hall, of the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences at Waterloo, and senior author on the study, explaining: “The problem is the fact that effective diabetes management relies pretty heavily on executive function.
“Essentially people with type 2 diabetes may be hit with the double whammy of having more need for executive control, but – possibly because of the disease’s effect on the brain – less intact resources for exerting it.”
Previous studies have suggested that older adult type 2 diabetes patients can improve their executive function by staying physically active, and consistently engaging in activities that are cognitively stimulating.
Aerobic exercise and cognitively challenging activities – such as learning new things, solving difficult puzzles and other problem solving activities – all help to keep your brain sharp,” Hall added. “Aerobic exercise is probably the most important, however, because it has benefits to both the brain and the rest of the body simultaneously.”

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