News

Victoza does not help people with heart failure, study finds

The type 2 diabetes drug Victoza (liraglutide) does not help people with advanced heart failure, according to new research.
The study, conducted by researchers at Duke Clinical Research Institute, failed to delay death or improve clinical stability in patients with advanced heart failure.
Liraglutide is a GLP-1 analogue, which is a class of injectable drugs that lower blood glucose levels by stimulating the release of insulin and inhibiting the production of glucagon. Unlike Jardiance (empagliflozin), another diabetes drug which reduced hospitalisation from heart failure in a small study, Victoza led to no improvements for people with advanced heart failure.
The researchers tested liraglutide on 300 participants, some of whom had type 2 diabetes and some of whom didn’t. They found no significant difference between a placebo and liraglutide when it came to preventing death or hospitalisation due to heart failure.
“We’re disappointed this didn’t work out, but it’s important to understand heart failure and diabetes together as common problems,” said Dr. Adrian Hernandez, professor of medicine at Duke Clinical Research Institute and one of the study’s lead researchers.
Heart disease is one of the most common diabetic complications, and the leading cause of death among people with diabetes. Because of the common links between diabetes and heart disease, the researchers are keen to search for any potential cardiovascular benefits that may be associated with diabetes drugs.
The findings were presented at the American Heart Association (AHA) scientific meeting in Orlando, Florida.

To Top