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Campaign to improve airport security for insulin pumps users goes to UN

A campaign calling for airport security to allow insulin pumps to be exempt from being put through x-ray machines is to be considered by the United Nations (UN).
Rachel Humphrey, from Hampshire, launched the campaign, after she was detained along with her husband and 14-year-old son George, who has type 1 diabetes and uses an insulin pump, by security at Dubai airport. A security officer ordered that George’s insulin pump must be disconnected and put through the x-ray machine.
Despite producing official documentation and informing the officer of the medical consequences of removing the pump along with the risk of damage being caused to the pump by passing through an x-ray machine, the family were made to wait two hours and only allowed to travel after a doctor confirmed Mrs Humphrey was correct.
George’s spare pump was taken away from him and held by staff until they arrived at Heathrow airport. The upset of the situation led the mother to campaign for better treatment at airports for users of insulin pumps.
So far the campaign has gained the support of almost 5,000 people including Prime Minister Theresa May.
Responses have also been received from the Chief Executive of the UK Civil Aviation Authority and the Chief Executive of the Airport Operators Associatio, the trade association made up of more than 50 airports, which represents the interests of UK airports.
Mrs Humphrey has received assurances from the Airports Council International (ACI) that the campaign has been forwarded to the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), the UN’s agency for aviation. The ICAO will give their advice on how to bring the forward issue to airport screening authorities globally.
It is really great that Mrs Humphreys has put in so much time to this campaign which could save many families in future from unnecessary hassle and anxiety.
People can support the campaign by signing the petition called, ‘Standard Policy for Insulin Pumps at Airport Security’.

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