Insulclock technology set to transform insulin administration

Jack Woodfield
Wed, 12 Dec 2018
Insulclock technology set to transform insulin administration
A pioneering device is set to transform insulin administration for people with diabetes who struggle to remember when they took their last dosage.

The Insulclock system tracks and records the amount and type of insulin used, so it can be accessed at any time by the user, or shared with their healthcare team.

The device is attachable to any disposable insulin pen, turning it into a smart pen which works alongside a phone app.

Insulclock also monitors the temperature an insulin pen has been exposed to, preventing insulin from being spoilt due to becoming too hot or too cold.

Project coordinator Mr José Luis López Sánchez-Pascuala, who helped develop the technology, said: "All this information collected and recorded by the Insulclock system can be shared by patients with their endocrinologists, diabetes educators and caregivers, who will be informed on patients' evolution in real time."

Mr Sánchez-Pascuala has had type 1 diabetes for more than 20 years and was inspired to make the device because he always struggled to remember when he had injected his last dose of insulin.

"We have a mission. We are going to improve the quality of life of millions of diabetic people by increasing the adherence to their treatment, through tracking all what is happening in the moment of the insulin administering, with the use of a device connected to their insulin pens and keeping track of their blood glucose levels," he added.

"We also want to show the device keeps patients on top of what their condition demands on [a] day-to-day basis."

The system is being trialled in the US, which is being led by Dr Guillermo Umpìérrez, from the Emory University in Atlanta. Two more trials are beginning in Spain.

Dr Umpìérrez said: "We are setting out to show patients adhere to insulin treatment more effectively, reducing their HbA1c values."

Insulclock is now available for purchase.
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