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NHS applauded for improving diabetes technology access

The NHS should be applauded for significantly improving access to diabetes technology for people in the UK, the editor of a leading magazine has said.
On the week of the NHS turning 70, Sue Marshall, editor of Desang Diabetes Magazine, paid tribute to the NHS for its work with diabetes wearables.
The magazine conducted a survey of 300 people and found that insulin pumps were used by 24% of respondents.
The poll also showed the top two most popular technology devices are blood test meters, followed by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) kits.
Ms Marshall said: “We were amazed at how many people are obviously being given access to wearable technology. This is hugely significant for people who have diabetes as technology has been scientifically shown to enrich and simplify their lives with improved health outcomes.
“I believe this trend is a direct result of the hardworking NHS teams who work tirelessly, ensuring the health of the nation is as good as it can be. They should be applauded for their efforts.”
More than 300 people took part in the survey, which also showed that many people favoured mobile phone apps that track blood sugar levels, glycemic index and carb counting to help manage their diabetes.
Other findings suggests that 70% of survey participants test their blood sugar at least three times a day and many of them have attended a structured education programmen, such as DAFNE, and benefitted from the sessions.
Of course, there is always more that needs to be done. More than 10% admitted they did not fully understand what HbA1c levels were, although nearly 80% said they take notice of their blood sugar levels and react accordingly.
As the NHS celebrated its 70th birthday this week, we reviewed its amazing efforts in helping to treat people with diabetes as well as seven of its most groundbreaking achievements over the last seven decades.

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