Type 2 diabetes diagnosis before 40 increases early death risk, study reveals

Jack Woodfield
Wed, 14 Mar 2018
Type 2 diabetes diagnosis before 40 increases early death risk, study reveals
Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes before the age of 40 increases the risk of early death, according to new research.

A UK study has shown those who develop the condition are 2.5 times more likely to pass away at a younger age, compared with those who are diagnosed after the age of 60.

Dr Bob Young, who was involved in the study, said: "These important results add to the weight of evidence that type 2 diabetes in people of working age carries the greatest health burden, and is an especially severe condition in this age group."

While the findings are concerning, it is important to recognise that in recent years, many people have managed to fight back against type 2 diabetes and achieve remission. Remission in type 2 diabetes is when blood sugar levels are down to a healthier level without the need for diabetes drugs.

Our Low Carb Program, which won the Positive Social Impact Award at the Lloyds Bank National Business Awards UK 2016, has helped people put their type 2 diabetes into remission through normalising blood sugar levels and aiding weight loss.

The research team used data from the National Diabetes Audit involving more than 2.7 million people across seven years. Alongside their primary discovery, they also identified that people from a South Asian ethnicity were five times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes before they reach 40.

The findings of the study, which Diabetes UK said is the largest of its kind, were unveiled at the Diabetes UK Professional Conference this week, which is taking place at ExCel (Exhibition Centre London).
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