World's largest low-carb type 1 diabetes study set to start

Benedict Jephcote
Mon, 14 May 2018
Worlds largest low-carb type 1 diabetes study set to start
The world's largest study of how a low carbohydrate diet can impact and help control type 1 diabetes is set to start this autumn.

The Dietary Science Foundation in Sweden, which funds scientific studies focused on diet and how it can affect health, has been raising funds to carry out the work.

A number of studies have already shown low carb diets to have a lot of potential towards improving type 1 diabetes health. Last week, research into low carb and type 1 diabetes made the headlines as it showed that a group of mainly children and young adults were able to achieve excellent control on a very low carb diet.

A larger study could more emphatically demonstrate the benefits of eating low carb on the management of type 1 diabetes.

According to the organisation, of the 50,000 people in Sweden who have type 1 diabetes, only 25% manage to control their blood sugars at the recommended level with standard care. This leaves a lot of room for improvement and the low carb lifestyle shows significant promise for helping people improve their control.

Now, Stockholm's Ethical Review Board has given the study the go ahead and researchers have begun the next stage. Lead researcher Anneli Björklund, associate professor and senior physician at Karolinska University Hospital, said: "We just started recruiting patients and our goal is to get the study going properly this [autumn]."

Diabetes.co.uk has witnessed many people with type 1 diabetes on the Diabetes Forum that have turned their lives around and greatly improved their diabetes control through following a low carb lifestyle.

Dr Ian Lake is a UK GP with type 1 diabetes who has seen first-hand how beneficial low carb can be for type 1 diabetes management. We firmly believe the low carb diet can greatly improve the health of well-being of people who have type 1 diabetes in those that are ready to give it a try and have the support from their diabetes health team.
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