Join the Real Food Day cause and raise awareness of healthy eating

Jack Woodfield
Wed, 19 Jun 2019
Join the Real Food Day cause and raise awareness of healthy eating
People are being supported to embrace whole foods to help people steer clear of the health problems associated with processed food and takeaways.

Real Food Day, launched by non-profit organisation Public Health Collaboration (PHC), takes place on Wednesday 19 June.

Real food is all about eating minimally processed foods such as vegetables, fruit, dairy, meat, fish and lentils.

The focus is on buying foods that are in a close form to how they come from nature. This means choosing full fat dairy rather than low fat dairy. Low fat dairy involves taking the natural fats out which alters the natural balance of the nutrients.

The PHC says the way the British public has approached food has changed dramatically in recent years. Between 2010-2018 there was a 34% rise in how many people in the UK visited fast food outlets.

For the Real Food Day campaign, organisers are hoping to inspire people to eat 'real food' and avoid 'fake food' and also participate in physical activity every day to mark the occasion. Events will be held throughout the country, with activities planned to take place in schools and workplaces.

Dr Aseem Malhotra, Cardiologist and member of the PHC Advisory Board, said in May: "There is now evidence that lifestyle diseases can be reversed through real food lifestyles. Eating a balanced diet is important for everyone from children learning at school to employee productivity in the workplace to athlete’s performance on the track.

"By celebrating real food and highlighting the positive effect on everyone, every day, we can really make a difference for the future health of the nation."

On Twitter people have been sharing their stories about why they support Real Food Day, and Diabetes Digital Media's Low Carb Program is also supporting the campaign.



The Low Carb Program, which shares the focus on embracing real food, is helping people to make healthier choices, with participants losing weight, lowering their HbA1c and one in four putting type 2 diabetes into remission after one year.
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