DAFYDD - Dose Adjustment for your Daily Diet

DAFYDD stands for Dose Adjustment for your Daily Diet
DAFYDD stands for Dose Adjustment for your Daily Diet

The DAFYDD education course was the first accredited patient education programme in Wales.

The DAFYDD course teaches how patients with type 1 diabetes can match their insulin doses to food intake through carbohydrate counting.

As well as helping to improve blood glucose levels, participants will learn how to adapt insulin doses to compensate for exercise, illness and alcohol, which can affect blood sugar readings.

How can I join the DAFYDD programme?

The DAFYDD course is held across Wales. If you live in Wales and would like to be referred then you should consult your GP, DSN or consultant.

Otherwise, the diabetes education courses available to you will depend on where you live. If you live near Wales, it may be you live in a particular city where other courses such as DAFNE and BERTIE are provided.

Am I eligible for the DAFYDD course?

To be eligible for the DAFYDD course, you must have had type 1 diabetes for at least six months and be treated with multiple daily injections (MDI).

Participants are required to be on MDI treatment involving fast-acting insulin with meals and a long-acting insulin taken once or twice a day.

What does the DAFYDD course entail?

The DAFYDD course involves attending a four-day course. These four days are held once a week across four consecutive weeks – each day lasts for six hours.

There are three trained educators that will guide you through the program.
On the course, participants should be prepared to adjust their insulin doses. You will also keep records of food intake, blood glucose levels and insulin doses given. There are normally no more than eight participants on each course.

Does the DAFYDD course work?

A number of measures are examined by the education providers during and after the course, including HbA1c, weight and hypo awareness.

The DAFYDD course has been shown to increase participants’ diabetes control, as well as having more control over how much they eat, while exercise and alcohol have reportedly shown enhanced management from DAFYDD participants.