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School accused of diabetes discrimination

The family of a girl diagnosed with diabetes have hit out at her school after being told that she could not enjoy a school trip abroad because of her condition.
Lucy Harriso, 12 years, has been living with type 1 diabetes since the age of five and requires daily injections of insulin to keep her blood sugar levels under control.
Last year, her family paid hundreds of pounds for her to travel with her classmates to Spain. But just days before the flight out, her parents received a call from Forge Valley Community College in Stanningto, Sheffield, informing them that Lucy would not be able to travel because the school didn’t have the right insurance and staff were not permitted to administer medication to Lucy in the event of a hypo (a fall in blood glucose).
Dad Stephen Harrison criticised the school’s decisio, saying the risk assessment should have been done months, not days, before the trip.
He said: “I just don’t think it is acceptable – it is so unfair. All her mates are going and Lucy said ‘Why can’t I when everybody else can?’ I had to tell her it was because of her diabetes . This is discrimination.
“Isn’t it hard enough having to deal with diabetes and then be singled out saying she can’t go as though she is different to other children?
“The staff member said the school wasn’t insured and also they can’t touch Lucy if she has a hypoglycemic attack. All they can do is give her painkillers and a plaster.”
Forge Valley offered to refund the cost of the five-day trip or cover half the cost of one parent travelling with Lucy to Spain.
But Stephe, a former professional snooker player, said he was unable to take the time off work to accompany Lucy at such short notice.
“She can’t be the only person in school with diabetes so it is not just about her,” the 40-year-old added. “The school should have a policy in place.”

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