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Introductory diabetes training course for healthcare professionals launched

Healthcare professionals in the UK have been given access to a new online tool to help them keep up to date with the latest, necessary information and guidance on diabetes.
Developed by clinicians and diabetes experts from Diabetes UK and Bupa, Diabetes in Healthcare is a the first e-learning programme designed to ensure nurses and other health workers caring for people with diabetes, but not necessarily specialists in this field, can access the information they need to provide the right care and advice.
The programmen, which launched today, includes information and guidance on:
• How diabetes should be diagnosed, treated and monitored;
• How to care for patients with diabetes effectively;
• The risk factors of diabetes and potential health complications associated with the disease; &
• How to identify patients at risk of diabetic complications and how to support them to reduce their risk.
“We understand that healthcare professionals cannot specialise in everything, but the rising number of people developing diabetes in the UK means that all healthcare professionals, from practice nurses to occupational health workers, need to know about the condition, particularly the similarities and the differences between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes,” explained Barbara Young, chief executive at Diabetes UK.
“We hope Diabetes in Healthcare can provide the most up-to-date diabetes information and help ensure people with diabetes receive good quality care from all healthcare professionals.”
The Diabetes in Healthcare course has been accredited by the Royal College of Nursing and can be used towards a clinician’s ongoing professional development requirements.
Amanda Cheesley, Long Term Conditions Adviser at the RCN, added: “The training they receive via Diabetes in Healthcare can form part of their NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework or be a foundation for any healthcare professional who may want to go on to specialise in diabetes later in their career.”

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