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World renowned scientist awarded for efforts in diabetes research

An internationally renowned diabetes researcher has become the first person to be awarded the $250,000 Harold Hamm International Prize for Biomedical Research in Diabetes.
Dr. Peter H. Bennett has become the inaugural recipient of the prize from the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center at the University of Oklahoma. He was selected by a jury of international diabetes experts for his work, which they said has had, and will continue to have, a lasting impact on the field of diabetes.
Dr. Timothy Lyons, chairman of the Selection Jury, said: “Dr. Bennett’s work is truly foundational in the world of diabetes research. He has made huge contributions to our understanding of what diabetes is, the genesis of its complications and how we prevent both the disease and its complications.
“Certainly, one day we hope to have a real cure for diabetes, and that cure will no doubt be as a result of the foundation Dr. Bennett’s research has laid.”
Harold Hamm, chairman and CEO of Continental Resources Inc, who recently provided the endowment to establish the prize, commented: “My hope in launching this unprecedented international research prize is that we would ignite worldwide scientific interest and innovation to find a cure for diabetes in this generation.
“Dr. Bennett’s work has long inspired others to follow in his footsteps and move the world closer and closer to a cure. Over the past 50 years, he has continuously made major scientific contributions to the understanding of diabetes, its mechanisms, complications and prevention.
“The cure for diabetes will be built on the shoulders of giants like Dr. Bennett, so it is fitting that we honour him with the inaugural Hamm Prize.”
Dr. Bennett’s groundbreaking research, which spanned more than four decades, research identified insulin resistance as a major risk factor for diabetes, led to internationally accepted criteria for diagnosis of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and introduced the notion that Type 2 diabetes is preventable through diet and exercise.
He currently serves as scientist emeritus at the diabetes research branch for America’s National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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