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Diabetes cases rise by 65 per cent since 2005, BHF analysis finds

The number of adults with diabetes in the UK has risen by more than 65 per cent since 2005, according to an analysis by the British Heart Foundation (BHF).
Roughly 3.5 million people were diagnosed with diabetes between 2014 and 2015. In the previous year, this figure was 3.3 million, while the figure was two million in 2004/05.
Around 90 per cent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, but there was no breakdown of data in regard to cases of type 2 and type 1 diabetes in the BHF analysis, who analysed GP data in their report.
Professor Peter Weissberg, medical director of the BHF, said they highlighted the findings due to the strong link between diabetes and heart attacks.
Weissberg said: “Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Up to four million adults in the UK have diabetes so treatments are urgently needed that can help prevent them suffering a deadly or disabling heart attack or stroke.”
On Saturday 14 November, the BHF marked World Diabetes Day by announcing more than £3 million of funding for research into heart disease and diabetes. It is hoped this funding could lead to new treatments to prevent people with diabetes dying early from cardiovascular disease.
“Research we’re funding is showing us how diabetes can affect the blood vessels and bring on disease. By understanding this process, we hope to develop medicines that can prevent this disease process or even reverse it,” added Weissberg.
People with diabetes can prevent heart disease by keeping good control of your weight and blood sugar levels. Eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly, limiting your alcohol intake and avoiding or quitting smoking can also reduce the risk of heart disease.

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