Israeli scientists trial artificial pancreas technology in youngsters with type 1 diabetes

Jack Woodfield
Tue, 14 Feb 2017
Israeli scientists trial artificial pancreas technology in youngsters with type 1 diabetes
Israeli researchers believe the testing of their new hybrid closed loop system could lead to young adults with type 1 diabetes "living their lives to the fullest".

This new trial is one of the four major studies that will assess the safety and efficacy of artificial pancreas systems in people with type 1 diabetes. All projects are being funded by by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health.

A grant of £5.57 million ($6.94m) has been earmarked for this trial which will compare Medtronic's MiniMed 670G system to GlucoSitter, an artificial pancreas algorithm developed by DreaMed Diabetes, based in Israel, that is programmed to further improve blood glucose control, particularly around mealtime.

For three months, 100 young people aged between 14 and 30 will test each system to see which device provides better results. The team will then monitor how each system affects the person's quality of life.

"We are hopeful this next-generation closed-loop technology will not only further improve blood glucose levels in a safe manner but actually let these teens and young adults focus on living their lives to the fullest," said lead author Dr Moshe Phillip, director of the Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetes at Schneider Children's Medical Center.

Dr Revital Nimri, part of the GlucoSitter algorithm development team, added: "After a decade of algorithm development and successfully clinical studies, we are excited to be able to test our unique MD-Logic combined with Medtronic's PID algorithm in this multinational clinical study."

A closed loop artificial pancreas system is a device, or set of devices, that automatically gives the correct amount of insulin in response to food intake and rising blood glucose.

If this trial is successful, along with the other three trials, it could prove significant in the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

The study will be carried out by the Institute for Endocrinology and Diabetes at Schneider Children's Medical Center, along with the International Diabetes Center (IDC).
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