Using a consultation model which involves shared decision-making and setting personal goals has been welcomed by people with type 2 diabetes in the Netherlands.
Dutch researchers wanted to explore how person-centred care affected people’s involvement in their condition.
This new model trialled included taking stock of factors that affect diabetes care for the individual, setting personal goals, choosing treatment and determining required care. It involved 74 doctors, 31 nurses and 1,366 appointments which usually lasted less than 25 minutes.
The findings showed that two out of three people spoke about their condition for more than half of their appointment time. Treatment goals were also based on relatable factors to the individual.
A total of 94.4% of patients reported that the model helped make shared decisions with the healthcare professional about their condition, making them feel more involved, and gave a rating of 8.6 out of 10 for the consultation.
More than half also said they felt their appointments had improved since becoming involved in the structured consultation approach.
Lead author Dr Guy Rutte, from the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands, said: “A consultation model to facilitate person-centered care seems well applicable and results in more patient involvement, including shared decision-making, and is appreciated by a substantial number of patients.”
In the UK, it is recommended that people with diabetes have an individual care plan drawn up which meets the criteria of the model in the Dutch study. If you wish to have an individual care plan from your doctor, you can request to have an appointment with your doctor.
The study findings have been published in the Diabetes Care journal.

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