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Scots keen on measures to make food healthier, according to national survey

The majority of people in Scotland agree that food should be healthier, according to the Scottish Social Attitudes survey.
The 2016 survey was sent out to a random sample of 1,237 people aged 16 and over. Forty questions were included in the obesity module of the survey. Currently, two thirds of adults in Scotland are overweight and 29% are obese.
Nine out of 10 people agreed that cheap fast food is too easily available. 82% of people agreed on measures to make food healthier although responses to the type of measures varied.
For example, most people (62%) agreed on a tax on sugary fizzy drinks. Less than half, 47% agreed on a tax on fatty foods.
The fact that less than half of people support a tax on fatty foods could reflect an understanding that dietary fat itself is not unhealthy. It is awkward for public understanding that foods that are high in both fat and carbohydrate are listed as fatty foods.
66% of respondents backed restrictions of sugary and unhealthy snack foods at supermarket checkouts. Most people also agreed that advertising and sponsorship of unhealthy food should be restricted.
Out of the listed measures to prevent and reduce obesity, having access to free weight management courses was the most backed option at 86% agreement.
Obesity is a leading topic in the modern world and one that can be confusing for many people. The nutritional guidance given by the NHS and NHS Scotland, to eat low fat, has not helped matters as long-term research has shown low fat diets to be largely ineffective.
In 2015, Diabetes.co.uk launched the Low Carb Program which provides step-by-step guidance to enjoying a lifestyle that is healthy. People with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes that follow the program have benefitted from an average 7kg of weight loss, reduced HbA1c levels and many people have been able to reduce their medication needs.

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