A teenager with type 1 diabetes passed away in her Glasgow flat but thankfully her baby boy was found alive two days later.
Sadly, there have been a number of widely-reported diabetes-related deaths in the UK this year. Courtney Newlands, who was 19, is believed to have died from complications of type 1 diabetes, although cause of death has not yet been confirmed.
Courtney lived in the Glasgow’s Penilee area. She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes aged four. She had been unwell for several days before she died, with Lucozade and her insulin found next to her.
Police smashed her door down after family members became concerned, and discovered five-month-old Declan next to her in his cot, dehydrated but alive.
Courtney’s death is believed to have been caused by complications from type 1 diabetes, although the exact cause is still not yet known despite a post-mortem.
The family are waiting for the results of more detailed tests. It is thought she died on either February 19 or 20.
Courtney’s mum Lorraine, who is 43 and lives in Pollok, Scotland, told the Mirror: “They did say that if it was something related to the diabetes it would show up in the post mortem but there was nothing there. They had changed her insulin so many times. We don’t know though.”
Declan is now living with sister Lorraine, 23, having spent two days in hospital.
Type 1 diabetes can be a difficult condition to manage. Speak with your healthcare team if you are finding controlling type 1 diabetes overwhelming – your health team will be able to help you and give you support.

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