Diabetes and Stopping Smoking

Smoking is a risk factor for diabetes
Smoking is a risk factor for diabetes

Stopping smoking could be the most important health decision you ever make, whether you have diabetes or not. As well as being an independent diabetes risk factor, for people who already have diabetes smoking increases complication risk.

Diabetes complications include heart disease and stroke.

To mark diabetes week we have focused on quitting smoking and how best to do it.

Smoking doubles complications risk

Smoking could double complication risk, as well as damaging the bank balance. Furthermore, it could increase kidney problems and the risk of erectile dysfunction as well as increase the risk of neuropathy and retinopathy. Stopping smoking lowers the risk of major diabetes complications, as well as leaving you healthier, richer and more attractive.

Please read the threads below for some community advice one stopping smoking. If you don’t feel able to stop yourself, seek free advice.

Face down the issue by talking with your healthcare team. Below are some examples of people that have stopped smoking and posted about it on our forum:

What the community are saying about stopping smoking?

  • Synonym:Well done on not smoking for a week! You have done the worst bit and now just have to keep going. As for the hunger and putting on the weight you will need to find something low-carb to nibble on and find other things to do with your hands.
  • Haggis1972: With the money I saved from smoking I took the husband and my kids out for a meal (make sure you give yourself a treat for stopping).
  • Foxglove: Know what it's like, took up smoking at about sixteen, gave up at about 30. Started again at 55 and gave up again 2 years later. Daft thing to do, I know. Very rarely get the urge these days now at 75. Wish I could be as successful at giving up the chocolate!
  • Kay957: I gave up 5 years ago this month, I am glad I did. I had chronic Asthma and now it's not too bad. Giving up was the best thing I have ever done, it was hard to give up a 40 a day habit, but I did it cold turkey, because I found the patches et al rather useless in my case (they work for others but didn't for me). Keep up the good work you'll be breathing much better soon. It would seem that the problem with aspirin is not actually its acidic qualities that result in holes in the stomach wall, but the fact that it causes ulcers in the wall or even local bleeding. These ulcerated spots are less able to renew themselves, hence in some people the wall can be breached.
  • Daisy: I needed a gum operation and the dentist told me I had to cut down on my smoking (2 or more packets a day). I was so fed up with people telling me to stop smoking - my friends - that I decided while out jogging that I wouldn't have a cigarette when I got home. I was motivated but also decided to help myself by using nicotine gum. It keeps your mouth busy. I didn't have any cravings thanks to the gum so didn't have to rely on willpower. It took me 6 months to give up the gum though! This was over 30 years ago and I have never smoked since. It was my third attempt to give up so keep at it - you will manage it in the end!
Your Comments
 
gave up smoking nearly 3 weeks ago, feeling the health benefits of being able to breathe, fantastic, hope I never smoke again, I did smoke for 36 years and I am determined this is the end of it :-)
Posted by Trisha Spour, South shields on Tuesday, June 29, 2010
Smoking is certainly associated with the development of diabetes mellitus and also with its bad outcome. So all, particularly diabetics, should quit smoking as soon as possible.
Posted by shahjada selim, dhaka, bangladesh on Thursday, June 17, 2010
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