The Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system has secured approval in the United States from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
The G6 system marks another step forwards for diabetes technology as the system includes smaller sensors, a new applicator for the sensors and no longer requires finger-stick blood glucose tests for calibration.
The sensors are slimmer than previous sensors, being around 28% smaller overall. The new G6 system does not require finger-stick blood glucose tests for calibration purposes although these can be taken if needed. The application device for the sensors is much improved. It has a simple push button and looks a lot more approachable for the user than previous insertion devices from Dexcom.
As with the Dexcom G5, the G6 system can connect with smartphones and wearable devices, such as certain smartwatches. Glucose data can be shared with up to five followers, which allows people to chare their data with a partner or other members of the family for example.
The G6 sensors should provide accurate data for 10 days. This is an improvement over the G5 sensors which were approved for providing accurate data for seven days. However, the new sensors will stop working and must need to be replaced after the 10 days are up. Sensor life will be an important consideration for users.
Kevin Sayer, chief executive of Dexcom, said: “We think G6 carriers are a significant improvement in performance by building on the accuracy and reliability that patients have come to expect from Dexcom continuous glucose monitors, including what we believe will be a more consistent experience across all 10 days of use while eliminating the need for routine finger prick calibrations.”
The FDA gave the G6 system the green light on the 27 March, three months sooner than had been expected. It is due to be available in the US by the summer. Diabetes.co.uk will look out for and report when the G6 is approved for use in Europe.
Image: Dexcom.com

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